What the vicar did for the past six months (timesheets)


So I’ve run Timerecorder App on my phone for six months now and the graph below shows where my time has been spent.

Sept 13 to Feb 14 task graphIn order from most time spent to least, the work of organisation and communication (which includes meetings) has taken 18% of my time, probably because I find it difficult and I’m not very good at it.  Preparation for teaching and preaching then took 17%.  Next comes visiting and counselling, at 10%, which I am delighted about.  That’s a good amount of face to face time with people, most often with the bible open.  Then teaching and fellowship take 8% each.  That means that only 8% of my time is spent up front in public, including leading small groups.  Public preaching or leading is only the tip of the iceberg.  And 8% of time wth others (fellowship) is time building relationships with with church folk, without any real purpose (after church and at coffee morning or lunch club).  6% on study, conferences and blogging, 6% on school and 6% on occassional offices (mostly funerals).  4% has gone on developing vine workers.  3% on youth and children.  3% on extra parish (deanery and diocese).  Then travel, spontaneous interuptions, acts of service, church government, buildings and finance, evangelism and outreach and prayer meetings take up the last 9%.

I believe this shows that I need to find a way of reducing organisation and communication (paperwork and meetings) and increasing prayer and deliberate teaching and training.  How?

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4 Responses to What the vicar did for the past six months (timesheets)

  1. Where does watching Midsomer Murders figure in this?
    Is there a special section for rodent chasing?

  2. neilrobbie says:

    I do both those things whilst @thevicarswife tweets about them, so making for a very happy marriage.

  3. Andrew says:

    But family don’t appear at all on your sheet. I think that they should and if it means factoring in time then do so and proclaim the brilliance of family life by doing so.

  4. neilrobbie says:

    Hi Andrew, welcome to TG. Point taken, though I don’t count family time as work, so it doesn’t appear on the sheet. Rather, I limit the hours I work and carve out blocks of time for my family.

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